Growth

Rich and Co.

Getting Help to Protect and Build Your Online + Social Media Reputation

“The collection of Web capabilities and practices grouped under the rubric of “Social Media” has quickly morphed from a cutting-edge way to foster awareness to a mainstream business practice. In fact, given its growing popularity, companies that don’t get their arms around social media may risk tumbling into a competitive abyss.”

“The promise of social media is that if you do it well, your customers do the work of spreading the word for you, so we should always expect these dollar amounts to be small.  And if you do it well, you’ll get more return than from traditional media.” CFO magazine 

Increasingly social media tools like Linked In, blogs and other tools are being adopted by professionals to more effectively connect with other professionals, clients and peers.   When someone wants to review your professional credentials and learn about you, likely they will first go to Linked In and the do a Google search.

It is important that your professional image and reputation be optimal and protected in online environments.  It can be as basic as:

Making sure your picture communicates a professional imageHaving your writing be up-to-date, compelling and focused on your problem-solving skillsIdentifying damaging or inaccurate information on Google

You need professional help with these tasks.  We coach you and your staff to optimize and protect your online and social media image and reputation.  We also stay involved to make sure you have a continuous presence — to help grow your businesses. 

Contact us, to learn about our approach.

Here is an article on social media from CFO magazine telling how even hard-headed CFOs are seeing the advantages.  Here are excerpts from the article:

Social-Media Frenzy — Amid The Chatter, Companies Are Beginning To Achieve Tangible Benefits.
David McCann, CFO Magazine February 1, 2011

The collection of Web capabilities and practices grouped under the rubric of “Social Media” has quickly morphed from a cutting-edge way to foster awareness to a mainstream business practice. In fact, given its growing popularity, companies that don’t get their arms around social media may risk tumbling into a competitive abyss.

The technology still poses risks; giving consumers a platform from which they can shape a brand’s message is a scary proposition, and there have been plenty of stories about employees blogging or tweeting everything from confidential company information to racist rhetoric. But companies are increasingly deciding that the benefits win out.

A 2010 study by communications firm Burson-Marsteller found that 65% of the largest global companies had Twitter accounts, 54% had Facebook fan pages, and 50% had YouTube video channels. And research firm Gartner predicts that by 2014, social media will have surpassed e-mail as the primary communication vehicle for a fifth of business users.

Finding new ways to listen to people can be something of a sport.

Bang vs. Bucks
When it comes to assessing the ROI of social media, companies generally have to be content with identifying a positive impact on customer engagement.

It’s difficult to correlate engagement to the bottom line, which is why some senior executives still aren’t sure whether they want to make the investment.

But investments don’t break the bank.   

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Written by Rich and Co.

March 12, 2011 at 8:22 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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