Growth

Rich and Co.

ORGANIZATIONS LEARN MORE FROM FAILURE THAN SUCCESS/KNOWLEDGE GAINED FROM FAILURE LASTS LONGER

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“The most significant implication of this study…is that organizational leaders should neither ignore failures nor stigmatize those involved with them…rather leaders should treat failures as invaluable learning opportunities, encouraging the open sharing of information about them.”

Organizations learn more from failure than success, study finds; Knowledge gained from failure lasts longer

…failure is a far better teacher, and organizations that fail spectacularly often flourish more in the long run…

Desai’s research,….focused on companies and organizations that launch satellites, rockets and shuttles into space — an arena where failures are high profile and hard to conceal.

…organizations not only learned more from failure than success, they retained that knowledge longer.

“We found that the knowledge gained from success was often fleeting while knowledge from failure stuck around for years…But there is a tendency in organizations to ignore failure or try not to focus on it. Managers may fire people or turn over the entire workforce while they should be treating the failure as a learning opportunity.”

The researchers said they discovered little “significant organizational learning from success” but added “we do not discount the possibility that it may occur in other settings.”

“Whenever you have a failure it causes a company to search for solutions and when you search for solutions it puts you as an executive in a different mindset, a more open mindset,” 

He said the airline industry is one sector of the economy that has learned from failures, at least when it comes to safety.  “Despite crowded skies, airlines are incredibly reliable. The number of failures is miniscule,” he said. “And past research has shown that older airlines, those with more experience in failure, have a lower number of accidents.”

…he advised organizations to analyze small failures and near misses to glean useful information rather than wait for major failures.

“The most significant implication of this study…is that organizational leaders should neither ignore failures nor stigmatize those involved with them…rather leaders should treat failures as invaluable learning opportunities, encouraging the open sharing of information about them.”

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Written by Rich and Co.

January 26, 2015 at 5:28 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

One Response

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  1. Reblogged this on Brain Molecule Marketing and commented:
    Makes sense

    Brain Molecule Marketing

    January 26, 2015 at 5:50 pm


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