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Rich and Co.

Hyper-Visual: How our Brains Process Visual Stimuli Create Culture, Tech and Everything Else

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The animal, mammal, primate and human visual system literally creates the world around us.  The media must feed our visual system, so too politics, tech, culture and businesses.  Tech is so successful because it is always getting closer to the millisecond processing speed of our visual system in the brain.   A visual system that evolved looooong time ago in pre-human history and the forest and plains of our fish, mammal and primate ancestors.

Trump doesn’t read he watches cable TV, so too his voters.  Look and act.  Not much else.  the instincts and impulses to look and act control it all.  forget thought, contemplation or anything else “conscious.”  Stimulus > response.  Hyper-mechanical.  Instantaneous.  Hyper-visual.

Here are some quick findings from research.  Links to longer material are at the end.

Take Aways:

  • In about a tenth of a second—too quickly for us to even be aware it’s happening—our brains figure out what we are seeing and make sense of it

  • half of our brain is dedicated almost exclusively to vision.

  • Seeing an odd or unexpected interaction between two objects stimulates our brains to release more opioids, thus giving us increased enjoyment.”

  • We get more opioid release and thus more pleasure from looking at those shapes….Our eye movements are not random but… they are directed towards entities that will give us more opioid activity—a system that is established as early as four months.”

[The quick visual system] “It’s the miracle of pattern recognition..People can be misled into thinking it’s a very easy, simple process because it occurs so quickly and automatically..“Of course, we also get color, texture and movement, but most of what we understand and remember about what we see comes from shape…A line drawing of a scene tells us pretty much what we want to know.”

Pleasure in Seeing Sumptin’ New
“Interestingly, opioid receptors, which convey nerve signals linked to pleasure, are dispersed in a gradient along the entire visual pathway, with few receptors in the early stages building to more and more in the later stages. This opioid fix explains the joy and appeal of new experiences…”

“We found that being able to recognize a scene that we specifically have never seen before gives us more opioid release—and thus more pleasure—than something we can’t recognize or that we’ve seen many times before,”

“When you have a new experience:
– initially many neurons are activated
– But once the experience is over, the neurons that were most strongly activated inhibit the neurons that were only weakly or moderately activated by that experience.
– The next time you have the same experience, you get less opioid release.
– This explains why we seek out new experiences.

Seeing an odd or unexpected interaction between two objects stimulates our brains to release more opioids, thus giving us increased enjoyment.”

Laughter from Recognition of the Unexpected Is Universal
“In contrast, visual art may be able to give us the new experience we crave, but it can be debatable whether a certain work of abstract art is creative,” he said. On the other hand, there is no debate when humor is successful, as the end result—laughter—is pretty much universal.

Craving New information
Biederman says this desire for new but interpretable information is a system that makes us “infovores”—eager consumers of information.

“That greater activity means we get more opioid release and thus more pleasure from looking at those shapes….Our eye movements are not random but…they are directed towards entities that will give us more opioid activity—a system that is established as early as four months.”

…training actually changes the way the brain works, improving visual processing in the primary visual cortex, the starting point for visual processing in the brain.

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Written by Rich and Co.

April 25, 2017 at 7:51 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

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